Relationship Roundup

This week in the Roundup, tips for building accountability, understanding the power of language, securing commitments from prospects, and taking culture past the friendly point.

Where accountability starts and stops – Accountability is the foundation of sustainable change. Consultant and author Steve Tobak shares how to reinforce the accountability in your company. Read the CBS Money Watch article here: http://cbsn.ws/MWBcjz.

The language of our corporate cultures – Words have power. In this Harvard Business Review blog, author Kevin Allen Partners explores the way language creates the environment for corporate culture. Read it here: http://bit.ly/NJN2Qx.

Getting a commitment – Getting prospects to commit requires strategy. Sales expert and author Tom Searcy provides tips for achieving the big C. Read the article here: http://cbsn.ws/NuZXsj.

Building cultures that are beyond friendly – Culture specialist Chris Edmonds writes about the three elements that create thriving and healthy organizational cultures. Read the blog here: http://cbsn.ws/NuZXsj.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.

The Greenlight Highlight: How A Young Professional Practices Relationship Mastery To Serve and Succeed

Maxwell Lyons
Sydney, Australia (as of three weeks ago)
Greenlight Member Since: July 2010

Elevator Pitch: “I love being stretched and attempting to play above my current capacity. Born and raised in a small town in Idaho, I owe so much of the success I’ve had in life to the relationships I’ve developed.”

What experience in your past was the moment you recognized how important relationships are to your success? 

I grew up valuing friendships, but hated “networking”. I viewed it as pretending to be something and someone you are not, and that never sat well with me. After I read Never Eat Alone, it flipped what I thought about networking on its head and showed me that my friends and my business contacts could be one in the same. That’s the moment it clicked for me that relationships can be powerful, as well as fun, in the professional world.

What’s the coolest things you’re working on at home or at work right now? Continue reading

Relationship Roundup

This week in the Roundup, how to identify and utilize top contacts, invest in yourself, use social media in business, connect through conversation, and build your community.

Relationship planning for success – If you’ve used myGreenlight’s Relationship Action Planning tools, the concept of the “Critical 100” will be very familiar. In this Harvard Business Review blog, authors Ram Charan and Daniel Casse offer the steps for identifying and utilizing the most important 100 people in your organization. Read the blog here: http://bit.ly/MIoTY6.

Investing in #1 – Often our focus on the relationships that sustain us and our goals can lead to neglecting ourselves. This Inc. Magazine article offers advice on carving out the time to invest in your own development. Read it here: http://bit.ly/OGQw3h.

B2B social media – Great tips from Social Media Today on the best uses of the medium for business. Read the article here: http://bit.ly/NxNm5Z.

Connecting with conversation – Every conversation we have is an opportunity to advance a new and important relationship, learn something new, and/or advance a goal. Learn more about how to get the most out of your conversation in this Entrepreneur Magazine article: http://bit.ly/OU0ApJ.

Building your community – As we build our personal and professional brands, we are also building our personal and professional communities. Read this WordofMouth.org blog on managing the fan, follower, and community member relationship here: http://bit.ly/Om3Pq2.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.

The Kind of People You Want in Your Life

For the most part, the people that you surround yourself with are your choice. A recent Forbes article makes the argument that you should make those choices carefully and include certain types of people. Here’s the list:

  1. The instigator. This is the person you call when you want to get things done because they always say: “Let’s do it.”
  2. The cheerleader. Someone who gets you pumped up and believes in you no matter what, sort of like Donna Reed in It’s a Wonderful Life.
  3. The doubter. You always need someone to challenge you and make sure you’re really giving it your best shot.
  4. The taskmaster. The project manager type you need in your corner to make sure you’re not dropping any balls.
  5. The connector. As we always say at myGreenlight, it helps to have a great relationship with the kind of person who can connect you to the right people to make things happen.
  6. The example. This is usually your mentor, the person who has the experience and knowledge to help you get where you want to go, because they’ve already been there.

Do you agree with this list? What types would you add?

Ritu Walia is an FG Analyst.

Relationship Roundup

This week in the Roundup, how to manage separate social media identities, employee relationship building, confidence in business, and staying relevant on twitter.

Separate identities – One of our modern dilemmas for reputation management involves the decision to create and manage different profiles for different social media platforms. This SmartBlog on Social Media shares the results of a recent poll on the topic and the pros and cons of separate identities. Read it here: http://bit.ly/Ls8EgT.

Building the employee relationship – The foundation of all great relationships start with trust. Learn how to strengthen the relationships important to your business in this SmartBlog on Leadership: http://bit.ly/NzUa1C.

Be larger than life – Big audacious goals require a big audacious perception of self. A Harvard Business School Professor shares lessons from a case study that illustrates the best practices of using confidence and influence to create a big impact in business. Read the HBR blog here: http://bit.ly/Lyr6cq.

Boost the perception of competence – Those who voice an opinion project confidence to others. For some tips for putting your voice into the discussion and gaining greater influence, read the SmartBlog on Leadership here: http://bit.ly/NzsmZS.

Lead nurturing through Twitter – There are new rules for lead generation in the social media stratosphere. Read this Marketo blog for some rules for engagement: http://bit.ly/OZEJhE.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.

Heidi Roizen: To Build Real Relationships, Be Real

When you read the description of Heidi Roizen as a “legendary networker”, your first image might be someone with a stack of business cards, doling them out and shaking hands.

You would be wrong.

One of the key reasons that Heidi has had success in networking is because she genuinely cares about other people and builds real relationships with them.  And after you read this, you will also want to be one of her friends, even if only to get on her Christmas card list.

Heidi says:

“When I read somebody just shipped their product, or somebody just got a promotion, or somebody just had a baby, a little “attaboy” goes a long way in maintaining the relationship. People like to know that you’re thinking about them and that you notice when something happens to them, whether it’s good or bad. If someone experiences a death in their family, sending them an actual hand-written card is a really nice thing to do. It’s a human gesture. People appreciate that. And I don’t do it because I’m trying to manipulate. I do it because I think it’s the right thing to do as someone who cares about other people. But these things help. Continue reading

Relationship Roundup

In the Roundup this week, tips to strengthen your reputation and network on and offline and new tools for behavioral marketing.

Building a lucky network – We agree wholeheartedly with CueBall CEO Anthony K. Tjan on what it takes to build a lucky network, “vulnerability, authenticity, generosity, and openness.” Read his perspective on how to create luck for your business ventures in his Harvard Business Review blog here: http://bit.ly/S5QCG4.

Candor is positive conflict – Conflict is an unavoidable reality, thus getting good at using it to you and your teams’ advantage should be high on the priority list. Cambridge Professor and author Mark de Rond shares how to get comfortable with team conflict. Watch his Harvard Business Review video blog here: http://bit.ly/MieIJL. Continue reading

Relationship Roundup

This week in the roundup, a networking power plan, Gen Y’s relational advantage, responding to negative feedback, and the Smile Factor.

Network power plan – Pre-planning your strategy for networking events betters your chances for getting to the right prospects so you can focus on whom to build relationships with. Learn how to create a solid game plan in this CBS MoneyWatch article: http://cbsn.ws/MZx8xS.

Gen Y Advantage – It seems that Gen Y knows how to build relationships with its younger counterparts to the advantage of their careers. Learn what they are doing here: http://cbsn.ws/LBVUIj.

Responding to Negative Feedback – Social media is making customer relationships tricky to manage. Being skillful with your response to negative feedback is critical. Learn some of the finer points of feedback response here: http://bit.ly/KI5Agn.

The Smile Factor – Warming up a face-to-face introduction with a smile often works. Making your marketing deliver the same effect can have long lasting positive results in building the relationship with the customer. Learn how to create smile worthy communication here: http://bit.ly/N2K9J4.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director. 

The Secret Formula That Will Score You a Meeting with ANY VIP – from Christine Comaford

During her Social Capitalist Interview, multi-hyphenate Christine Comaford (author, entrepreneur, consultant, coach…) shared the secrets from her blog post titled: “I Stalked Steve Jobs and How to Get a Meeting with Any VIP.”

Christine says:

“It’s not that hard to get a meeting with any VIP. The quick recipe is to ask for five minutes of their time in exchange for you giving five hours to their favorite nonprofit.

So you’ve got to do some homework. When you first connect with them, send a letter. I prefer a letter that’s typed and sent via FedEx. One of my clients, a huge high-level executive at Deloitte just used this approach. He finally got through to someone he’s been trying to reach for three months.

You figure out what it is that you want: I want five minutes of advice from Joe Blow. So then you send a letter, one page or less. Don’t ramble on. Just say, ‘Wow, I really admire the accomplishments that you’ve made, Joe Blow, in your life. I want to do that too. I would love to ask you for five minutes of advice.’ Continue reading

A Simple Exercise to Overcome Shyness

If social interactions stress you out, you might be interested in this Psychology Today piece offering some simple exercises to overcome shyness and social anxiety.

The author suggests some group improvisational exercises that are worth checking out. But for those who want something they can do on their own, there’s this one:

“…go to a mall at a busy time of day. Take off your watch. Ask twenty people for the time of day. Use three minutes between requests. You log the results of each encounter. You later look at your findings. Here is what you are likely to find. Most will give you the time of day. Some will walk past you as though you didn’t exist. A few may engage you in a brief and pleasant conversation.”

The idea is to approach enough people that it starts to feel natural.

Anyone else have ideas for “safe” ways to practice interacting with strangers?

Ritu Walia is an FG Analyst.