Rohit Bhargava on the Social Capitalist: Can You Become More Likeable?

Ever have the sneaking suspicion that no matter how hard you work, you could be passed over for a promotion or new opportunity for someone who’s not smarter or more talented, but simply more likeable?

On Thursday Oct 11, 12pm ET, marketing expert and author Rohit Bhargava will confirm those fears but also offer actionable solutions as our guest on the Social Capitalist, with host Sara Grace. He’ll be talking about his book Likeonomics, which tells us that nothing is more important to your success, and the success of your company, than the simple metric of likeability.

You’ll learn:

  • The qualities that underlie likeability, and how to develop them and broadcast them to others
  • Why companies that celebrate unabashed honesty, extreme simplicity, and basic humanity in their employees see incredible ROI
  • How to inspire those values in your own workplace with your own colleagues, no matter what’s happening up top

Rohit is a member of the Global Strategy & Planning Group at Ogilvy. His first book was the bestselling Personality Not Included, and he is a leading voice on how to bring humanity back to business through social media and storytelling. His writing and ideas have been featured in media globally including Fast Company, Inc, PRWeek (UK), MarketingChina, and The New York Times. He teaches marketing at Georgetown University and a keynote speaker at business events like the World Communication Forum in Davos and TEDx.

We look forward to seeing you on the call! Click here to register.

Transcript and MP3 will be distributed the week following to everyone who signs up.

Heidi Roizen: To Build Real Relationships, Be Real

When you read the description of Heidi Roizen as a “legendary networker”, your first image might be someone with a stack of business cards, doling them out and shaking hands.

You would be wrong.

One of the key reasons that Heidi has had success in networking is because she genuinely cares about other people and builds real relationships with them.  And after you read this, you will also want to be one of her friends, even if only to get on her Christmas card list.

Heidi says:

“When I read somebody just shipped their product, or somebody just got a promotion, or somebody just had a baby, a little “attaboy” goes a long way in maintaining the relationship. People like to know that you’re thinking about them and that you notice when something happens to them, whether it’s good or bad. If someone experiences a death in their family, sending them an actual hand-written card is a really nice thing to do. It’s a human gesture. People appreciate that. And I don’t do it because I’m trying to manipulate. I do it because I think it’s the right thing to do as someone who cares about other people. But these things help. Continue reading

The Secret Formula That Will Score You a Meeting with ANY VIP – from Christine Comaford

During her Social Capitalist Interview, multi-hyphenate Christine Comaford (author, entrepreneur, consultant, coach…) shared the secrets from her blog post titled: “I Stalked Steve Jobs and How to Get a Meeting with Any VIP.”

Christine says:

“It’s not that hard to get a meeting with any VIP. The quick recipe is to ask for five minutes of their time in exchange for you giving five hours to their favorite nonprofit.

So you’ve got to do some homework. When you first connect with them, send a letter. I prefer a letter that’s typed and sent via FedEx. One of my clients, a huge high-level executive at Deloitte just used this approach. He finally got through to someone he’s been trying to reach for three months.

You figure out what it is that you want: I want five minutes of advice from Joe Blow. So then you send a letter, one page or less. Don’t ramble on. Just say, ‘Wow, I really admire the accomplishments that you’ve made, Joe Blow, in your life. I want to do that too. I would love to ask you for five minutes of advice.’ Continue reading

Jeffrey Pfeffer: Get Comfortable with Standing Out or You Never Will

Stanford Professor Jeffrey Pfeffer is the author of 13 books.  He discussed his most recent, Power: Why Some People Have It and Others Don’t during a Social Capitalist interview.

So I look at folks. I think the average human being, not everybody, but the average human being, is too concerned about what other people think. They are too worried about standing out. They’re too worried about asking for favors because they’re worried about what other people would think about them and they’re worried about being too bold. Continue reading

Heidi Roizen: Getting the Door Slammed in Your Face Means You are Doing it Right

In the investment world there is an accepted relationship between risk and return. In order to get a big return, you generally have to accept a significant level of risk. In her Social Capitalist interview, legendary networker Heidi Roizen shared her thoughts on the relationship between risk and return in relationships – and why, if doors aren’t getting slammed in your face from time to time, you probably aren’t risking enough.

Heidi says:

“I think you have to have a certain amount of tenacity and belief in yourself and what you’re trying to accomplish. Sometimes it takes a while to get other people on the same page with you. Sometimes, they’re never going to get on the same page. I think there’s a fine line between appropriate persistence to just beating a dead horse and becoming an annoying presence to the other person. Again I think you have to have the approach of asking yourself, What’s in it for them?

When you approach someone, sometimes there are clear “no’s,” but sometimes there are people who are a little skeptical and maybe need to be convinced. Maybe you need to do more homework…Sometimes there’s a longer process to building relationships and getting people on the same page with you. Continue reading

Why Christine Comaford Says You Should Approach Your Next Contact Palm-Up

Christine Comaford is an entrepreneur, author, and consultant. In her Social Capitalist Live Event interview she said that she has been through at least 11 reinventions of herself. Here she shares some of her best advice about building relationships based on generosity.

Christine says:

“The number one thing is networking palm up. What most people do is palm-down networking. “What can I get?” They go to a cocktail party, they’re trying to grab stuff. That’s palm down. Palm-up networking is finding out what somebody needs and helping them get it. You’re going to get yours later, the universe has a perfect accounting system. So if people simply change their networking approach to be palm up, you walk around at a cocktail party, you ask what business they’re in: “Wow, that’s cool, how did you get into that business?” Everybody has a great story as to how they’ve gotten into their business. “Wow, what’s your ideal client?” “Oh, I might know some of those guys. I’ll follow up with you next Tuesday.” Continue reading

Christine Comaford’s Tip for Making Sure Your Message Gets Through

During her dynamic interview as part of our Social Capitalist series, Christine Comaford shared the concept of metaprograms. Created by Rodger Bailey, these are lenses through which people see the world.  Knowing which lens is in use is key to making sure your message is heard and received.

Christine says:

“The first metaprogram is towards or away. Each of these meta-programs is polarized. So if somebody is like, “Yes, I want to launch new initiatives, I want goals, I want forward motion,” that’s a towards person. An away person is all about risk mitigation: “Let’s be cautious, let’s not go crazy and jump in.”

The CEOs, the marketing people, the sales people, are often towards people. The CIOs, maybe, the accounting people, maybe HR, are away. So if you’re trying to get a CFO on board of a certain initiative, you say, “Hey, you know what? Let’s be real cautious, let’s make sure we’ve got all the I’s dotted and T’s crossed.” They’re going to feel a sense of rapport with you. Now you’re not this crazed sales or marketing or other type of towards person who wants to mow them down.

The next one is options or procedures. Options people are like, “Wow, here’s all these possibilities. We could do this and that and that,” and everybody’s all excited. Procedures people, listening to that, are getting freaked out. Procedures people are thinking, “OK, I just need to know step one, step two, step three, because I don’t want to mess it up. Don’t give me all those choices.” Continue reading

Heidi Roizen Tells You How to Mint Your Own Currency

Social Capitalist Heidi Roizen is known as Silicon Valley’s most legendary networker, but she had to build those relationships from the ground up just like anyone else. In this week’s tip she shares advice about finding and creating the currency you can offer to build a generosity-based relationship with anyone.

Heidi says:

“I do think there’s something truthful in asking the questions of any relationship you build, what do you bring to the table for that other person? What is the context of the relationship? What can you offer? Everyone has something to offer, but I think that people don’t realize it, particularly those who are just starting out.

Let’s take a situation where you want to get to know someone in your community who runs a company. Maybe you can’t do something directly for them, but maybe they’re involved in a charitable organization and you can go volunteer, work to death, and help with membership. You can go and do something. And eventually, as I find in many charitable organizations, it’s pretty easy to work your way up the ranks, if you devote some time and energy to doing it. And eventually, you will end up in a circle with that person or have an opportunity to talk to them. Continue reading

Relationship Roundup

This week in the roundup, a few ways to challenge yourself to get out of your shell, manage difficult tasks, and put your relationships on the right track. Get growing.

Rough relationships – Part of gaining greater relationships is learning to constructively resolve conflict. In this CBS MoneyWatch article, Robert Pagliarini outlines six steps to resolve conflict. Read them here: http://cbsn.ws/JtzB1q.

1-2-3-4 goal! – We all like shortcuts. Learn four quick steps to hurdle the goals in your life here: http://cbsn.ws/JNfL7i.

Are you eating alone? – Your computer is not the lunch date we had in mind when we said “never eat alone.” Shared meal times are great for information sharing and possibly meeting new people in the office. As the author of 168 Hours shares in this article, splitting lunch time between efficiency and socializing provides the right balance for a healthy work life. Read more here: http://cbsn.ws/KmWu7t.

Learn to network better than Bill Clinton – Former guest to myGreenlight’s Social Capitalist series, author and executive coach Christine Comaford, shares her secrets on generous networking and the palm up theory. Read her Forbes blog here: http://onforb.es/JrXdZX.

Embarrassment as accountability – While this method is certainly unorthodox, I can’t help but be curious about its ability to motivate. A new leisure site Aherk aims to motivate the completion of tasks by blackmailing users with a Facebook post of an embarrassing photo if they miss the mark. Read more here: http://bit.ly/Jd92V9.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.

Heidi Roizen: How Your Daily Walk Can Help Pay it Forward

The majority of our relationship-building activities, even when based on generosity, are driven by a desire to connect up – to meet people who have more influence, more connections, more experience. During the Social Capitalist interview with legendary networker Heidi Roizen, she shared some of the benefits of connecting down and being open to building relationships as a mentor.

Heidi says:

“One of the things I do, and I recommend this to people on the other side of the food chain, people who’ve already built a big network but still want to be open, is to pay it forward. That means that I take an hour walk every day, and I populate that hour with a person. And in my book, they don’t have to have a lot of qualifications to be that person. So a lot of times, if someone approaches me and says, “I’m a student,” or, “I’m starting a company” – and admittedly I particularly focus on young women entrepreneurs – I’ll say to them, “Great, I’m willing to spend an hour with you if you’re willing to come to my house and walk with me and my dog.” Continue reading