Relationship Roundup

In the Roundup this week, more strategies and skills to facilitate great leadership and better relationships in your network.

Superhero teamwork – Good team work requires respecting each individual team member’s unique “super powers”. Read the fine art of managing super teams in this article from Thought Leaders, LLC here: http://bit.ly/L5lYeN.

Leadership is not a popularity contest – Popularity and strong leadership have some similar outcomes, but being popular is not a requirement for effective leadership. Leadership trainer, Kevin Eikenberry evaluates popularity can affect your leadership goals. Read his blog here: http://bit.ly/NyrLuJ. Continue reading

Relationship Roundup

Communication skills take center stage this week. Learn how to make virtual technology work for you, take control of your communication style, and direct it in a more purposeful and intentional way.

Emails that spark action – Here’s some advice and tips from CBS MoneyWatch contributor Dave Johnson for cutting through email clutter and eliciting the response you intended. Read Dave’s advice here: http://cbsn.ws/L0fydo.

Emotional intelligence – Do you have the heart for leadership? Explore the importance of your emotional capacity and your effectiveness as a leader in this Inc. article. Read it here: http://bit.ly/KYd8KN.

Clear up your communication – You can communicate all you want, but if no one understands you, you’re wasting time and money. This Inc. article offers a self-assessment checklist and tips for clearing up your communication clutter. Read more here: http://bit.ly/KK6o6G.

Communication alignment – Elevating your communication skills elevates your relationship building skills. One of the fundamentals of transmitting clarity to others is to clarify our nonverbal and verbal cues. Read the CBS MoneyWatch article here: http://cbsn.ws/M9Zxae.

Don’t be a virtual violator – With so much of our daily interaction happening via technology, the rules of engagement have changed. Mashable offers the latest business rules for communicating virtually. Read the article here: http://on.mash.to/KYerJE.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.

Win a Year of myGreenlight – Scholarship Contest

We want everyone to have access to amazing relational capital, so today we kick off our second scholarship contest. The winner will receive a FREE one-year unlimited membership to myGreenlight.

This prize, worth $699 (!), includes unlimited access to all of myGreenlight’s resources.

  • 3-course core curriculum
  • Field-tested Relationship Action Planning tool
  • 15+ hours of webinars and masterclasses, on everything from presentation skills to body language to social media branding
  • Multimedia Coaching Resource Center
  • Hundreds of samples, templates, and articles on-demand
  • Weekly newsletter to help sustain progress
  • Monthly live Social Capitalist Event with leading business thought leaders
  • Access to our alumni directory
  • Moderated community forums
  • Lifeline Group Recruiting and Accountability tool
PLUS the winner will receive all 3 of our Kickstart Bonus Courses
  • Five Steps to Relational Capital that Closes the Deal
  • Career Advancement: Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile
  • Entrepreneur’s Launch Kit

Each BONUS package includes an easy-to-implement action sequence with myGreenlight support materials – rocket fuel as you build your tailored network to make your dreams reality.

To win – submit your entry in the comments below. Tell us about your biggest relationship or networking-related challenge and what you will achieve with the relationship skills you develop during the course. The most compelling response (as judged by Community Manager Kibibi Springs and Program Director Sara Grace) will receive the scholarship.

What would YOU do if you could build the relationships that wouldn’t let you fail?  Tell us!

Entries must be received by April 6th at 5PM Eastern Time.  Good luck!

For more information about myGreenlight, including access to our Spring Special deal ($200 off of the regular price) - click here.  If you enroll and then win the scholarship, your tuition will be refunded in full – so don’t wait!

Does Your Success Require a College Education?

My parents, both of whom earned master’s degrees and were front and center in my school’s PTA, taught me that some of the best learning opportunities are outside the classroom – for example, when they let me skip class to visit a local criminal trial in 8th grade. Though I loved school, I was still anxious to finish college early and find ways to learn that I would not only be paid for, but that would have some use beyond my GPA. Some of the brightest, most successful people I know today are autodidacts, high school and college dropouts. And in my work with myGreenlight, I’m part of a rapidly evolving world of online learning options that lets individuals close self-identified skills gaps affordably and on-demand.

All this is to say that I’ve been thrilled and excited by recent public debate around the value (and cost) of higher education. The conversation has been fueled by economists (e.g. Richard K. Vedder of Ohio University and Robert I. Lerman of American University); by venture capitalists and entrepreneurs (Peter Thiel and Seth Godin); by online educators  (startups like Udemy and sprawling organizations like the University of Phoenix) and by writers — most recently, Michael Ellsberg, whose new book The Education of Millionaires (recently discussed in his myG Social Capitalist interview and you can get a free first chapter at his site) seeks to teach vital success skills in sales, networking, and self-marketing that are neglected by university degree programs.

This week, Michael’s book provoked a tart review in Time, which Michael then rebutted in The New York Times.

Vartan Gregorian, president of the Carnegie Corporation and a former leader in several top universities, writes in Time that he welcomes “the kind of robust debate about the value of higher education that this book may engender.”

Unfortunately he doesn’t use his space in Time to contribute to that debate. Continue reading