Relationship Roundup

Elevate your relationship game with the tips and insights in this week’s Roundup, including how to rally your worldwide network, the art of negotiation, and a new app to help managers give credit where it is due.

Using the multiplier effect – Learn how to maximize your social media conversations in this Word of Mouth blog. Read it here: http://bit.ly/SUEax5.

Rallying your network – Our networks are getting more geographically dispersed but technology is offering new ways to rally the troops. Read the fine points of connecting the dots with a LinkedIn group here: http://bit.ly/NouHuv.

The art of negotiation – This article outlines a more generous, transparent, and authentic roadmap for negotiating. Read the CBSMoneyWatch article here: http://cbsn.ws/RMjyA2.

Empowering language – One of the things that will make you a relationship magnet is being aware of your use of language and its effect on the people you connect with. Culture strategist Chris Edmonds shares the power in “do” messages. Read his SmartBrief blog  here: http://bit.ly/QKjCpA.

Give generous props – A new application aims to help managers track projects and identify opportunities for recognizing employee accomplishments. Read about it in this Springwise article: http://bit.ly/QRsu7t

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.

Heidi Roizen: To Build Real Relationships, Be Real

When you read the description of Heidi Roizen as a “legendary networker”, your first image might be someone with a stack of business cards, doling them out and shaking hands.

You would be wrong.

One of the key reasons that Heidi has had success in networking is because she genuinely cares about other people and builds real relationships with them.  And after you read this, you will also want to be one of her friends, even if only to get on her Christmas card list.

Heidi says:

“When I read somebody just shipped their product, or somebody just got a promotion, or somebody just had a baby, a little “attaboy” goes a long way in maintaining the relationship. People like to know that you’re thinking about them and that you notice when something happens to them, whether it’s good or bad. If someone experiences a death in their family, sending them an actual hand-written card is a really nice thing to do. It’s a human gesture. People appreciate that. And I don’t do it because I’m trying to manipulate. I do it because I think it’s the right thing to do as someone who cares about other people. But these things help. Continue reading

Fixing Your Gmail Autofill So You’re Not Emailing People at Old Addresses

Have you sent an important email to an associate and realized three days or three weeks later that they never got it because it was an ancient address that Gmail decided to autofill in without you noticing? And once you realized it, you picked apart Gmail but couldn’t figure out how to solve the problem?

Help is here: Complete instructions on how to change the auto-complete addresses in Gmail so that you don’t keep emailing a contact at his or her old address!

(It actually took me a good amount of time and help from a coworker to figure this out.)

  1. First you have to click on the Gmail tab under the Google header on the left side of the page and select contacts.
  2. Once you’re in the contacts section, you can search for the contact you wish to edit in the search field.
  3. Once you’re on the contact page, you can make edits.

Viola! These two minutes of work can save you from emailing the wrong address over and over again once and for all. Get to it immediately when you learn a contact has a new address.

Another idea: Next time you update your own email, send these instructions with your announcement to make it easy on your Gmail-using friends.

Ritu Walia is an FG Analyst.

Heidi Roizen: Getting the Door Slammed in Your Face Means You are Doing it Right

In the investment world there is an accepted relationship between risk and return. In order to get a big return, you generally have to accept a significant level of risk. In her Social Capitalist interview, legendary networker Heidi Roizen shared her thoughts on the relationship between risk and return in relationships – and why, if doors aren’t getting slammed in your face from time to time, you probably aren’t risking enough.

Heidi says:

“I think you have to have a certain amount of tenacity and belief in yourself and what you’re trying to accomplish. Sometimes it takes a while to get other people on the same page with you. Sometimes, they’re never going to get on the same page. I think there’s a fine line between appropriate persistence to just beating a dead horse and becoming an annoying presence to the other person. Again I think you have to have the approach of asking yourself, What’s in it for them?

When you approach someone, sometimes there are clear “no’s,” but sometimes there are people who are a little skeptical and maybe need to be convinced. Maybe you need to do more homework…Sometimes there’s a longer process to building relationships and getting people on the same page with you. Continue reading

Relationship Roundup

In the Roundup this week, more strategies and skills to facilitate great leadership and better relationships in your network.

Superhero teamwork – Good team work requires respecting each individual team member’s unique “super powers”. Read the fine art of managing super teams in this article from Thought Leaders, LLC here: http://bit.ly/L5lYeN.

Leadership is not a popularity contest – Popularity and strong leadership have some similar outcomes, but being popular is not a requirement for effective leadership. Leadership trainer, Kevin Eikenberry evaluates popularity can affect your leadership goals. Read his blog here: http://bit.ly/NyrLuJ. Continue reading

Networking Takeaways from “Madmen”

“Madmen” fans: Have you ever found yourself at work asking, “What would Don Draper do?” (Hopefully you’re not asking yourself that when it comes to his personal life…)

My favorite professional takeaway from “Madmen” so far is actually a networking tip you can learn from Don or from Peggy: They both recognized early on that even though they were hyper-talented, they needed relationships to advance their careers, and did a great job developing them.

Don pushed his way into the world of advertising by stalking the well-connected Roger Sterling. This is interesting, since if anything their lasting relationship dynamic is as peers. They each know they bring something important to the table—Don, his talent, and Roger, his upper-crust network. Roger isn’t so much a mentor as a connector, although he does still sometimes school Don on the finer points of business relationship savvy. Continue reading

Why Christine Comaford Says You Should Approach Your Next Contact Palm-Up

Christine Comaford is an entrepreneur, author, and consultant. In her Social Capitalist Live Event interview she said that she has been through at least 11 reinventions of herself. Here she shares some of her best advice about building relationships based on generosity.

Christine says:

“The number one thing is networking palm up. What most people do is palm-down networking. “What can I get?” They go to a cocktail party, they’re trying to grab stuff. That’s palm down. Palm-up networking is finding out what somebody needs and helping them get it. You’re going to get yours later, the universe has a perfect accounting system. So if people simply change their networking approach to be palm up, you walk around at a cocktail party, you ask what business they’re in: “Wow, that’s cool, how did you get into that business?” Everybody has a great story as to how they’ve gotten into their business. “Wow, what’s your ideal client?” “Oh, I might know some of those guys. I’ll follow up with you next Tuesday.” Continue reading

Jeffrey Pfeffer: To Be a More Effective Relationship Broker, You Need New Friends

Jeffrey Pfeffer, Stanford University Professor and author of Power: Why Some People Have It and Others Don’t, is also the author of a popular business school case study based on myGreenlight founder Keith Ferrazzi. During his Social Capitalist interview, Professor Pfeffer explained the importance of becoming central in your network and taking on what he calls a brokerage role.

Brokers, even the literal term, bring people together. I mean, if you think about it, what is a venture capitalist? A venture capitalist links people with technology with people with money. And the people with money probably know other people with money. They don’t know people with technology and vice versa. So the broker fills this kind of structural hole and brings the two groups together.

That’s one of the things that effective networkers do. They find people who could benefit from being in contact with each other and put them in contact. And thereby, their sales profit from bringing those groups together. By the way, in order to do that, you have to do something that I think Keith really exemplifies and great networkers do, which is that you have to meet a diverse and broad set of people from a variety of industries and from a variety of walks of life. Continue reading

The Greenlight Highlight: How a Social Media Strategist Uses Relationship Mastery to be Systematic and Authentic

Anita Windisman
OneOfAKindMarketing.com
Toronto, Canada
Greenlight Member Since: December 2011

Elevator Pitch: Social media strategist & consultant. Helping you grow your professional practice or customer base by mastering LinkedIn.

What experience in your past was the moment you recognized how important relationships are to your success?

I’ve always been a connector and a networker and didn’t realize the full impact of that skill. I network naturally and being the hub and knowing what’s going on has always been a part of who I am. I value relationships. My network goes back to grade school. Loyalty is what I’m about.

What’s the coolest things you’re working on at home or at work right now?

Professionally I just launched my third public LinkedIn workshop. I love offering my services to small businesses and freelancers. On the other end of the spectrum I love working with very senior executives helping them showcase their expertise on LinkedIn. Both audiences need LinkedIn, but the reasons for doing so are different. I address the individual and the executive with the same tools, but in different ways. Continue reading

Relationship Roundup

In the roundup this week, an in-depth look at quick wins, what we can learn from bad behavior, the softer side of power, the value of youth in your network, and creative first impressions.

Quick wins – At myGreenlight we fully support the concept of quick wins on the way to big audacious goals. Read one Harvard Business Review blogger’s view on their benefits here: http://bit.ly/JH90V8.

Anti-relationship lessons – A view from the other side of the street is always a good way to heighten our perception and understanding. In this SmartBrief Blog, a few behaviors that will guarantee you won’t be #1 on anyone’s relationship list. Read more here: http://bit.ly/KXFZDk.

The softer side of power – The concept of what makes someone powerful is shifting. In this recap of Harvard Professor Joseph Nye’s new book, The Future of Power, there are three lessons on the softer side of power and how to apply them. Read Scott Eblin’s blog here: http://bit.ly/JqE8nZ. Continue reading