Relationship Roundup

Self-composure is key to relationship mastery. This week in the round up, find out how to transform natural habits and create tremendous advantages, be a seeker of opportunity, collaborate, and grow.

Male body language makeover – Getting a handle on our not so subtle body language barriers allows us to create more relationship opportunities. Learn the natural disadvantages to male body language in this Forbes article here: http://onforb.es/LRgAKS.

Being the calm in the storm — Keeping cool and composed in a crisis is one of the most challenging traits to learn if it doesn’t come naturally. Leadership expert John Baldoni shares some tips for appearing cool as a cucumber under pressure. View his SmartBrief Blog here: http://bit.ly/KEbvms.

Meeting resolutions – At times, meetings can turn manic. Knowing how to settle disputes effectively can keep the entire organization on track. Learn how consultant and coach Dana Theus helps resolve meeting disputes here: http://bit.ly/LBVMJ4.

Finding opportunity – Learning how to find the opportunity in a challenge will make you an unstoppable force at the office and in your relationships. Learn how to see what’s possible in this Harvard Business Review blog by Ron Ashkenas here: http://bit.ly/MX50LK.

Ideas wide open – Holding your great ideas close to the vest doesn’t allow for the greater opportunity to grow the idea with the input of others. Learn how to take a stance of openness in Nilofer Merchant’s Harvard Business Review blog here: http://bit.ly/M5wnc8

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.

Relationship Roundup

This week in the Roundup, I’m sending you into the weekend with news on collaboration, best uses for Google +, meetings that you’ll never forget, tips for finding balance and insight on the shift of power. Enjoy!

Get a collaborative boost. Collaboration is the new king of business. Author, Tammy Erickson shares why it’s key to the future of your businesses’ productivity in this HBR blog. Read it here http://bit.ly/JPF6to.

Intimacy building with Google+. Guy Kawasaki shares how social media engagement with Google + is less about getting to know new people and more about increasing the intimacy in the close circles you’ve already formed. Learn more here http://bit.ly/JKpZk1.

Memorable meetings. Part of your personal brand boils down to creativity. Long slow dinners in exotic locations for instance. Amy Levin-Epstein shares some truly creative meeting locations that will be perceived as nothing less than impressive. Read her CBS MoneyWatch blog here http://cbsn.ws/JIURDe.

Finding balance. Learning to juggle is one of the keys to being successful. In this HBR article by time coach Elizabeth Grace Saunders, learn the patterns of successful people. Read it here http://bit.ly/Koe62P.

Power shifts. The world is changing and age old concepts are changing with it. In this HBR blog, author of The New How Nolifer Merchant shares her take on the power shifts in play right now. Read it here http://bit.ly/IE6PyX.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.

Create Meetings that People Don’t Want to Hide From

“Most inventors and engineers I’ve met are like me … they live in their heads. They’re almost like artists. In fact, the very best of them are artists. And artists work best alone …. I’m going to give you some advice that might be hard to take. That advice is: Work alone… Not on a committee. Not on a team.” – Steve Wozniak

I’m a natural introvert – a social introvert, but an introvert. And so the Steve Wozniak quote above and the article I pulled it from, “The Rise of the New Groupthink,” play right to my instinctive bias.

But I know the value of collaboration. In the past couple of years, my work has become more about orchestrating a team than sitting in the corner pounding a piano. If you’ve got a grand vision, at some point, you’re going to need a team to carry it out.

So as a manager, I’ve put some thought into how to make the most of a collaborative environment – and in particular, how to help meetings be a place where both introverts and extroverts can flourish. “Meetings” have become synonymous in many offices with “massive soul-deadening time suck,” which is really too bad, because they can be fun, social, creative, and productive. I wouldn’t say I’ve got the formula mastered, but our meetings have produced consistently useful, actionable results.

A great team that likes and respects each other and the work they do is probably the biggest prereq for great meetings, so we’ve got it easy at myG. But a little planning wizardry helps too.

Here’s a few things I like to do: Continue reading