Christine Comaford Explains How What You Wear Can be an Act of Generosity

Christine Comaford is the author of Rules for Renegades, which might make you think that her advice would center around self-expression and breaking the rules. While breaking the rules is certainly one of her favorite themes, during her Social Capitalist Interview she shared some interesting perspective on why being a chameleon and adapting to what others want to see can be an act of generosity and service.

Christine says:

“It’s service-oriented. It really is. So just like in rapport, we step out of ourself then we say, ‘What does that person need to see?’ So Monday for instance, I’ll be in New York City. I’ll be in a room of 40 CEOs of mid-market companies. Forget me, OK? I’m not relevant. What’s relevant is what can come through me. What do those guys need to see? What they need to see, based on talking to the folks who are sponsoring the event and just listening, is someone who’s conservative, someone’s who’s got some really good answers to what is happening in the world right now and how they should manage change. Someone who’s going to help them walk away with like five tips so they can manage the radical amount of change in their organization today. So yes, I don’t like wearing conservative suits, but I will wear one. That will make them feel safe. Rapport tools help us step out of ourselves. Continue reading

The Greenlight Highlight: How a 24/7 Ambassador Leverages Relationship Mastery Skills to Create Professional Advantages

Mike Bruny
AmbassadorBruny.com
North Grafton, Massachusetts (outside of Boston)
Greenlight Member Since: March/2010
Nominated by Greenlight member: Aimee Lucas

Elevator Pitch: I am an operations manager by night and entrepreneur by day. I work mostly with young entrepreneurs and young professionals. I use hip hop lyrics as a form of personal and professional development.

What experience in your past was the moment you recognized how important relationships are to your success?

At an early age, I realized that relationships were important to my life success. I had an experience in my last year of Jr. High School. I didn’t get into any of the three high schools I applied to. That meant I would have to go to what is known as my “Zone School” (the one closest to your home). My zone school had a very bad reputation and I really didn’t want to go there. Lucky for me my principal saw something in me and decided to leverage her network to get me into John Dewey high school (a much better school). Her ability to change my life with a phone call highlighted the power of relationships to growth and progress. When she endorsed me, I went from having nothing to having a great opportunity that changed my life trajectory. Continue reading

MyGreenlight’s Community Manager Shares The Reasons She’s a Believer

Hi Greenlight Community!

We’re announcing a new promotion today, and I wanted to give you my personal take on why I think signing up for the myGreenlight program will be the best thing you ever do for your career.

As you’ve probably begun to notice, the world operates through relationships. Whether you’re a natural connector or not, a deeper understanding of the science behind human interaction can only equip you with more weapons in your career arsenal.

Over the past two years I have taken a strong professional communication skill set to new heights by applying the relationship mastery principles taught in the myGreenlight program. My touch points with Greenlight Community members have deepened my understanding of how a variety of personality types successfully utilize our training to reach their career goals. It’s been an exciting two years of discovery, hearing stories from those motivated to make a necessary change for themselves and their careers.

People like….

Aimee Lucas, an admitted introvert, who found inspiration in the Blue Flame principle and used it to guide her connection goals and advance her career.

Mike Bruny who uses generosity to truly connect with like-minded people and gain entry to opportunities that allow him to pursue his passion to inspire young entrepreneurs to reach their dreams.

Sandra Lester, whose commitment to get an accountability buddy for networking opened doors to opportunities she hadn’t even imagined for herself and positioned her as a trusted expert in her industry and giving her the ability to receive more job leads.

As I have seen these success stories unfold, I can very confidently say that I truly believe anyone willing to put in the work to engage in the myGreenlight program and complete the missions can gain massive benefits.

This is a perfect time to join myGreenlight at a discounted rate.  And our Spring promotion is open to anyone. If you know someone who is ready to improve their relationship game, please share the link with them. If that person is you, join us!

Check out the promotion here – a $200 savings on our regular rates and unlimited access to all of the proven resources of myGreenlight.

Have questions about the program? Use the comments and I’ll answer them.

Guest Blog: Ad Sales Executive Puts Never Eat Alone/myGreenlight Tactics in Action

Scott Olson is the director of marketing at Mediaspace Solutions, a marketing services agency bringing national brands to local markets. Mediaspace maximizes advertising budgets, increases ROI, and reduces operational drag through expert talent, incredible service and proven buying strategies. Our ‘What’s on Tap’ blog is updated twice a week and we’re regularly tweeting business to business marketing and advertising news.

In his best selling book Never Eat Alone Keith Ferrazzi sums up the argument for developing greater relationships when he says, “Life is less a quest than a quilt. We find meaning, love, and prosperity through the process of stitching together our bold attempts to help others find their own way in their lives. The relationships we weave become an exquisite and endless pattern,” (Never Eat Alone, 2005, p. 297, emphasis added).

Recently the Mediaspace Solutions business development group went through Ferrazzi’s book as a group in an effort to put what we learned into practice. Below are a few examples of both what’s been done and the sometimes immediate results we have experienced:

  • Small Gestures Big Impact – While on a recent trip to NYC, I decided to build a relationship with two CEO’s of major ad agencies. As part of the due diligence up front, I found out their favorite kind of wine by talking to their assistants. I purchased wine as gifts but bought Starbucks gift cards for their assistants. Both assistants were blown away by the gesture. “We never get any gifts” one said. I had two sincere conversations with two smart women and I now have regular communications with both of them. The key was being genuine and generous with no expectations in return. They are now on my “ping list” for regular communications. Keith’s teachings work. Continue reading

Ram Dass-Style Entrepreneurship

Be here, now. – Ram Dass

The value of presence – “being here, now” – has come up in several recent Social Capitalist interviews. Christine Comaford talked about its importance to leadership, calling it the quality that gives Bill Clinton his charismatic juju. Jonathan Fields talked about the importance of mindfullness meditation to creativity.

This morning, I’ve got a new spin on it, thanks to a conversation I had at Lucinda Duncalfe‘s Grubwithus dinner last night. Presence is incredibly important to the entrepreneur’s ability to generate ideas. (So perhaps this is really another take on Jonathan Fields’.) Entrepreneurs need to be present in the moment so that we’re sufficiently sensitive to life’s minor PITAs to recognize them, pause, and think about solving them.

James Altucher, yet another Social Capitalist guest, recommends “building your idea muscle” by writing down 10 or 20 fresh ideas every morning. But my new friend Ramya from the dinner had a different approach. She talked about paying attention so that every time you experienced a problem or an inconvenience, you flipped a switch to think, “Wait, is there a way to solve this?” In other words, cultivating a constant habit of identifying problems and brianstorming solutions – and “carrying a notebook everywhere.” It’s not unlike the myGreenlight mindset of constantly looking for opportunities to be generous to people – being here, now, so you’re truly listening and responding authentically – which brings us right back to Comaford and Bill Clinton. And actually, entrepreneurship itself is a form of win-win generosity and mutual self-interest.

Ramya’s thought brought me back around to presence – paying attention, exploring sensation, experience, and the tug of an inchoate idea, rather than wandering around in future-goggles thinking about what’s two weeks out.

If you’d like to get the transcripts or recordings for the Social Capitalist sessions I mentioned, here are the links:

Heidi Roizen’s Top Tip for Getting Emails Answered

This week’s Social Capitalist Tip is from Heidi Roizen, the venture capitalist and Stanford professor who is known as Silicon Valley’s most legendary networker. She is also the subject of a Harvard Business Review case study. During the interview, Tahl Raz asked Heidi about the key takeaways from that case.

Heidi said:

“If you want to boil this case down to one fundamental takeaway, it’s this: Don’t approach someone because you want something from them. Approach someone because you have something to offer.

Now there’s no reason that this can’t be a win-win for you as well. But think in terms of what value you’ll be bringing to other people. Ultimately, that’s why they’re going to continue to connect with you. It’s why they’re going to answer your phone calls and your emails and your whatever. They’ll see you as someone who can be helpful to them. I think that’s a very easy thing to learn, and it’s a very easy thing to test and to check as you go and carry out your life. When you intend to form a relationship with someone, the first thing you should think is, What value am I to them?”

Read a full transcript of the interview with Heidi, filled with other great tips and insights, by clicking here.

Mini Mission Monday

Sometimes it’s hard to think of a good reason to reach out and ping someone you haven’t talked to in a while. Luckily, a) you don’t really need a reason at all and b) with a tiny bit of research, you can easily find one, anyway.

Your mission:

Log into your LinkedIn account (if you don’t have one – your mission is to make one) and look at the “Updates” section. Scroll through the list and you are likely to find that someone has a new position, has received a promotion, or is working on an exciting new project.

Send congratulations to people with changes to report. Take advantage of the chance to rekindle a relationship. Ask questions to encourage follow-up. Showing you are interested and aware of happenings in the lives of your connections gets you back on their radar.

Guest Blog: How Generosity at One Conference Led to Opportunities at Several Others

Mike BrunyFounder of AmbassadorBruny.com, Mike Bruny is an author and certified life coach.

As a myGreenlight alum, I’m always looking for opportunities to put the mindsets and principles to work. A few months ago I had an opportunity to put the myGreenlight teachings into practice at an event and it led to opportunities at many others.

Where It All Started

In June 2011 I was working on a program called, “Hashtags to Handshakes: The New Art of Conference Networking.” Many of the principles in my program have been inspired by participation in myGreenlight. I was heading to the National Urban League conference, which was held in Boston this year. I noticed they had a panel discussion that would be focused on networking. Staying true to what I teach in my program, I researched the panelist and noticed I knew at least one of them from some work I did a couple of years ago. I made sure that I reached out to my old contact letting him know that I am looking forward to his session and reconnecting.

The day of the panel discussion had arrived and I was ready to tweet about the discussion.  I noticed that in many of the sessions during the conference, it was a mission to find out the twitter handles of the speakers. I’m not sure why they didn’t put it up on a slide before the session began. So, before we got started I went up to the panelists and let them know that I am looking forward to tweeting their words of wisdom and would like to include their Twitter handle. They gladly gave it to me.

I did as I promised and tweeted the information that I found valuable and even put together a summary following the event and made sure to send it to the panelist (You can read the post here.)  They were very appreciative and it allowed me to keep the relationship alive with many of them. Continue reading

Mini Mission Monday

Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. -Plato

Your success will eventually require you to deal with someone difficult, or to stay calm in a situation where someone else is creating tension.

When that time comes, the quote above is a powerful touchstone for finding a way to approach the challenge with generosity. Because no matter how caustic the personality, it is unlikely that the problem person wants to make your life harder. They are busy dealing with their own issues, and quite honestly, perhaps you are also working their last nerve.

Your Mission:

If you experience a tense moment today – take a breath and accept that the other party is most likely experiencing a challenge somewhere in their life. Find a way to reach through the tension and offer some kindness. Practice this regularly with strangers, and maybe it will eventually be key in managing an important business relationship.

Mini Mission Monday

How many times each day do you click over to Google or Bing to answer a question or research a challenge?

What if every one of those clicks was an opportunity to give generously to someone in your network?

Your Mission:  Every time you search for a piece of information today, think of 2 people in your network who could benefit from what you uncover. Send them a quick email letting them know that you found something you think they would find valuable and include a link. Instant generous ping.