Relationship Roundup

This week in the Roundup we’re amplifying the possibilities for earning greater connection, generosity, and intimacy in your relationships. Learn about the mutual benefits of mentoring, get new relationship action planning tips, see how to be generous with your old iPhone, and more!

The benefits of mentoring: Being generous with your time and knowledge is one of the best ways to expand yourself. This Harvard Business Review blog breaks down the mutual benefits of mentoring. Read it here: http://bit.ly/OczMaX.

The social media pitch: Building relationships in the brand new world of social media is terrain currently being charted. Learn the latest ways to make a good impression online in this New York Times article. Read it here: http://nyti.ms/QCaGhX.

Get better with social connection: Compensation is never a bad thing, but it’s rarely the key motivator that connects people to their organization. A more intimate approach is outlined in this Harvard Business Review blog that can have more positive impact on your organization. Read it here: http://bit.ly/RtJ7fo.

A daily dose of relationship building: Author and marketing inspiration Seth Godin provides a nice laundry list of items that can be used to accelerate your relationship action plans and your business goals. Read it here: http://bit.ly/UoORWI.

Eco-Generosity: I couldn’t resist sharing CBS Money Watch’s article listing several ways to be generous with your old iPhone as you upgrade to iPhone 5. Consider the opportunities to increase the intimacy with someone in your network by sharing functionality and facetime with you on the go. Read their suggestions here: http://cbsn.ws/Up2hlp.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Program & Community Director.

The Greenlight Highlight: How A Pastor and Consultant Extends Generosity to Build Sustainable Relationships

George Newman
Chicago, Illinois
Greenlight Member Since: August 2010
Nominated by Greenlight member Kibibi Springs

Elevator Pitch: I am a consultant to churches and the nonprofit industry, helping with organizational change related to servicing members. As a pastor it is my passion and goal to help others achieve what they need and desire.

What experience in your past was the moment you recognized how important relationships are to your success?

As a pastor and a minister I needed to improve the relationships with the young people in my church in order to help guide them in their spiritual life. I also realized having people in my life who would hold me accountable and provide structure, are important to my success. Learning from others’ mistakes and allowing people to steer me around the obstacles has been instrumental to my progress.

What are the coolest things you’re working on at home or at work right now?

In my current consulting role, I am helping a pastor develop ministries to reach more people and get them involved and engaged in the organization. It’s exciting to know that my work will leave this organization in a better position, which is in alignment with my purpose. I’m helping others help others. The affirmation I receive in the form of feedback from my clients lets me know that I’m contributing in an important way and that is very rewarding. Continue reading

The Secret Formula That Will Score You a Meeting with ANY VIP – from Christine Comaford

During her Social Capitalist Interview, multi-hyphenate Christine Comaford (author, entrepreneur, consultant, coach…) shared the secrets from her blog post titled: “I Stalked Steve Jobs and How to Get a Meeting with Any VIP.”

Christine says:

“It’s not that hard to get a meeting with any VIP. The quick recipe is to ask for five minutes of their time in exchange for you giving five hours to their favorite nonprofit.

So you’ve got to do some homework. When you first connect with them, send a letter. I prefer a letter that’s typed and sent via FedEx. One of my clients, a huge high-level executive at Deloitte just used this approach. He finally got through to someone he’s been trying to reach for three months.

You figure out what it is that you want: I want five minutes of advice from Joe Blow. So then you send a letter, one page or less. Don’t ramble on. Just say, ‘Wow, I really admire the accomplishments that you’ve made, Joe Blow, in your life. I want to do that too. I would love to ask you for five minutes of advice.’ Continue reading

The Greenlight Highlight: How a Seasoned Project Manager Uses Relationship Mastery to Foster Teamwork

Joseph Katucki
Wallingford, CT
Greenlight Member Since: June 2010

Elevator Pitch: “I’m not afraid of trouble, I like solving problems. I am a Project Manager specializing in turning around troubled projects. Currently I’m creating a leadership development program. I also mentor small businesses through the SBA’s SCORE program.”

What experience in your past marked the moment you recognized how important relationships are to your success? 

About five years into my professional career, I remember looking around the office and noticing who were getting fun assignments and promoted the fastest. It was those individuals who were personally and/or socially connected with the management chain.

What’s the coolest things you’re working on at home or at work right now?

I am leading the charge on an innovative leadership development program for the nearly 1,800 members of the Southern New England Project Management Institute (SNEC-PMI). It’s a program that includes a 360 leadership skills assessment, one-on-one feedback and coaching by a Center for Creative Leadership accredited leadership coach, three 3-day workshops facilitated by a hired consultant, and two 1-day events that will be open to the larger SNEC-PMI community.

The lessons I’ve learned about working with a volunteer organization have been invaluable. It’s taken a lot more time to get things moving and I have to approach every interaction with extreme generosity as every individual I rely on is there on a gifted basis. Continue reading

Relationship Roundup

In the Roundup this week, more strategies and skills to facilitate great leadership and better relationships in your network.

Superhero teamwork – Good team work requires respecting each individual team member’s unique “super powers”. Read the fine art of managing super teams in this article from Thought Leaders, LLC here: http://bit.ly/L5lYeN.

Leadership is not a popularity contest – Popularity and strong leadership have some similar outcomes, but being popular is not a requirement for effective leadership. Leadership trainer, Kevin Eikenberry evaluates popularity can affect your leadership goals. Read his blog here: http://bit.ly/NyrLuJ. Continue reading

Why Christine Comaford Says You Should Approach Your Next Contact Palm-Up

Christine Comaford is an entrepreneur, author, and consultant. In her Social Capitalist Live Event interview she said that she has been through at least 11 reinventions of herself. Here she shares some of her best advice about building relationships based on generosity.

Christine says:

“The number one thing is networking palm up. What most people do is palm-down networking. “What can I get?” They go to a cocktail party, they’re trying to grab stuff. That’s palm down. Palm-up networking is finding out what somebody needs and helping them get it. You’re going to get yours later, the universe has a perfect accounting system. So if people simply change their networking approach to be palm up, you walk around at a cocktail party, you ask what business they’re in: “Wow, that’s cool, how did you get into that business?” Everybody has a great story as to how they’ve gotten into their business. “Wow, what’s your ideal client?” “Oh, I might know some of those guys. I’ll follow up with you next Tuesday.” Continue reading

Relationship Roundup

This week in the roundup, career advice for maintaining balance and being an accountable leader. Plus, a real life example of networking’s importance to your success and using social media to generate generosity.

Healthy career advice – Sales expert Geoffrey James offers great advice for managing your career to maintain your sanity. Read Geoffrey’s Inc. blog here: http://bit.ly/MMSxOS.

Calling all aspiring leaders – Futurist Edie Weiner offers insight on the role that wisdom vs. intellect plays in the success of future leaders. View Edie’s Big Think video here: http://bit.ly/M3xVPM.

Networking for a win – Networking took center stage on the latest episode of TechStars where entrepreneurs aspiring to win the big prize had to network their way to a win. View the episode here: http://bit.ly/OB04zq.

Oh what a wonderful world – Author of Culturematic, Grant McCracken, investigates the possibility of a utopian world where kindness reins in even the most unfriendly civil landscapes. Read Grant’s HBR blog researching social media designed to generate generosity here: http://bit.ly/K26CmZ.

Accountability is key – Three simple words can build trust with employees. No, it’s not “I trust you”.  “I was wrong,” shows self-accountability and reinforces your character as a leader. View the Smartbrief blog from internationally known leadership expert, John Baldoni here: http://bit.ly/KUSAtz.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.

Heidi Roizen Tells You How to Mint Your Own Currency

Social Capitalist Heidi Roizen is known as Silicon Valley’s most legendary networker, but she had to build those relationships from the ground up just like anyone else. In this week’s tip she shares advice about finding and creating the currency you can offer to build a generosity-based relationship with anyone.

Heidi says:

“I do think there’s something truthful in asking the questions of any relationship you build, what do you bring to the table for that other person? What is the context of the relationship? What can you offer? Everyone has something to offer, but I think that people don’t realize it, particularly those who are just starting out.

Let’s take a situation where you want to get to know someone in your community who runs a company. Maybe you can’t do something directly for them, but maybe they’re involved in a charitable organization and you can go volunteer, work to death, and help with membership. You can go and do something. And eventually, as I find in many charitable organizations, it’s pretty easy to work your way up the ranks, if you devote some time and energy to doing it. And eventually, you will end up in a circle with that person or have an opportunity to talk to them. Continue reading

Jeffrey Pfeffer Says Save Generosity Until You Have Power

In his Social Capitalist interview, Jeffrey Pfeffer, Stanford Professor and author of Power: Why Some People Have It and Others Don’t, shared perspectives on power, kindness, and generosity that differ dramatically from one the fundamental concepts of myGreenlight – lead with generosity. How do you feel about his comments?

There is this tendency to assume that competency and niceness are, in fact, independent of each other. You can be smart and nice or dumb and mean. All four selves are possible. But empirically, people tend to see niceness and competence, or niceness and smartness, or niceness and brilliance, as being negatively related. Theresa Amabile, who’s now on the Harvard Business School faculty, wrote an article many years ago entitled “Brilliant But Cruel,” in which she found that people who gave negative book reviews were seen as not as nice, not as kind, not as warm, but also seen as smarter. Continue reading

Heidi Roizen: How Your Daily Walk Can Help Pay it Forward

The majority of our relationship-building activities, even when based on generosity, are driven by a desire to connect up – to meet people who have more influence, more connections, more experience. During the Social Capitalist interview with legendary networker Heidi Roizen, she shared some of the benefits of connecting down and being open to building relationships as a mentor.

Heidi says:

“One of the things I do, and I recommend this to people on the other side of the food chain, people who’ve already built a big network but still want to be open, is to pay it forward. That means that I take an hour walk every day, and I populate that hour with a person. And in my book, they don’t have to have a lot of qualifications to be that person. So a lot of times, if someone approaches me and says, “I’m a student,” or, “I’m starting a company” – and admittedly I particularly focus on young women entrepreneurs – I’ll say to them, “Great, I’m willing to spend an hour with you if you’re willing to come to my house and walk with me and my dog.” Continue reading