Relationship Roundup

Elevate your relationship game with the tips and insights in this week’s Roundup, including how to rally your worldwide network, the art of negotiation, and a new app to help managers give credit where it is due.

Using the multiplier effect – Learn how to maximize your social media conversations in this Word of Mouth blog. Read it here: http://bit.ly/SUEax5.

Rallying your network – Our networks are getting more geographically dispersed but technology is offering new ways to rally the troops. Read the fine points of connecting the dots with a LinkedIn group here: http://bit.ly/NouHuv.

The art of negotiation – This article outlines a more generous, transparent, and authentic roadmap for negotiating. Read the CBSMoneyWatch article here: http://cbsn.ws/RMjyA2.

Empowering language – One of the things that will make you a relationship magnet is being aware of your use of language and its effect on the people you connect with. Culture strategist Chris Edmonds shares the power in “do” messages. Read his SmartBrief blog  here: http://bit.ly/QKjCpA.

Give generous props – A new application aims to help managers track projects and identify opportunities for recognizing employee accomplishments. Read about it in this Springwise article: http://bit.ly/QRsu7t

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.

Remote Employees Are More Engaged? Really?

Employees who work remotely are actually more engaged with their teams than their “in-office” counterparts, according to a recent Harvard Business Review study. Surprised?

Our own Keith Ferrazzi has published advice on how dispersed teams can be more productive than co-located teams in Harvard Business Review, and yet my initial reaction was disbelief. How can individuals be more engaged with people they never see than with people down the hall? But author Scott Edinger proposes several possible reasons:

  1. Proximity breeds complacency.  Even co-located teams communicate primarily through email. It’s so easy to walk 100 feet to communicate personally that people take it for granted.
  2. Absence makes people try harder to connect. People make more of an effort to connect when they you don’t ordinarily interact with people.
  3. Leaders of virtual teams make better use of tools. When your primary form of connecting with people is virtual, you master many different modes of communication.
  4. Leaders of far-flung teams maximize the time their teams spend together. When remote people do finally get face-time with people they don’t see often, leaders do everything to maximize the precious time spent together.

Do you agree with Edinger’s suppositions? Have you noticed more engagement with remote teammates?

Ritu Walia is an FG Analyst.

Networking Mistakes You Can Avoid

It’s easy to get so swept up in the tides of social media and connection building or the urgency of a job search that you forget the key to successful networking: mutual generosity for mutual success. Recently Forbes published  Four Networking Mistakes You Don’t Know You’re Making that will help keep you on track.

Here’s the list:

  1. Don’t talk about yourself all the time, instead take some interest. There’s a reason we have two ears and only one mouth. By being curious about others, you show that you see their value and can build a sustainable relationship.
  2. Instead of expecting a job, add some value. The value train goes both ways. “If you’re looking for a job, don’t ask for it—work for it. Do some research into what your contact does both in and out of work and find ways that you can contribute your time or support.”
  3. Always say thank you. Pretty self-explanatory. Snail mail thank-you cards are a wonderfully thoughtful touch in today’s online world. Send them out as soon as possible.
  4. Stay accountable and always follow up. Stay true to your word to confirm the value of your brand.

What would you add? Are there some common networking mistakes you’d add to the list?

Ritu Walia is an FG Analyst.

From Cold Calls to Cocktails: Making the Connections that Will Transform Your Startup (and Your Social Life)

Looking to scale up your business development efforts and generate new opportunities?

Then join Sara Grace on the Social Capitalist, August 23 at 12ET, as business development expert Andy Ellwood generously opens the book on his stories, strategies, and wealth of hard-earned advice.

Click here to register!

Drawing on his popular Forbes blog, Andy will take questions and cover topics both tactical and strategic:

  • Why checking your cell phone at dinner is bad for business
  • How to make the perfect email introduction
  • The only three people you need to know at a party
  • How to host a happy hour that’s worth quadruple the bar tab
  • The key to balancing hustle with flow so that your interactions are both meaningful and productive Continue reading

Presidential Email Strategies

There’s no avoiding the fact that it’s an election year. You get bombarded just flipping through the channels, stopping by a newsstand, or even checking your email and favorite sites. In every way possible, election year is upon us.

Personally, I get emails from candidates straight into my inbox. It’s one way of keeping up with important national events and getting news from the campaign trail. It’s interesting to see how many myGreenlight values play into the communication strategies of the presidential candidates. Continue reading

The Greenlight Highlight: How A Young Professional Practices Relationship Mastery To Serve and Succeed

Maxwell Lyons
Sydney, Australia (as of three weeks ago)
Greenlight Member Since: July 2010

Elevator Pitch: “I love being stretched and attempting to play above my current capacity. Born and raised in a small town in Idaho, I owe so much of the success I’ve had in life to the relationships I’ve developed.”

What experience in your past was the moment you recognized how important relationships are to your success? 

I grew up valuing friendships, but hated “networking”. I viewed it as pretending to be something and someone you are not, and that never sat well with me. After I read Never Eat Alone, it flipped what I thought about networking on its head and showed me that my friends and my business contacts could be one in the same. That’s the moment it clicked for me that relationships can be powerful, as well as fun, in the professional world.

What’s the coolest things you’re working on at home or at work right now? Continue reading