Relationship Roundup

Building relationships online and offline boils down to being authentic and generous with your network. This week in the Roundup, there’s advice for brand management and a road test of the latest collaboration tools for your business.

The leadership track – Managing your personal brand and requesting regular feedback are two of the five items recommended to maintain your edge in the workplace. Read the article here: http://bit.ly/WzN0PL.

The business of youThe National Association of Women Business Owners encouraged members and participants of their Annual Women’s Business Conference to be authentic and use who they are to their brand advantage. Read the SmartBrief blog here: http://bit.ly/PCcYBW.

Build with kindness – This author summarizes how the Dalai Lama’s lesson on kindness applies to better business practices. Read the CBS MoneyWatch article here: http://cbsn.ws/TclWqA.

Social media relationships – Trying to figure out what to do with your likes and follows that will be meaningful to your brand? Read the SmartBrief article on building relationships with social media here: http://bit.ly/XoNZ51.

Social collaboration – Looking for an internal social chat tool to foster internal collaboration. This PC World blogger road tests three platforms to consider. Read the blog here: http://bit.ly/S3O8JC.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Program & Community Director.

Relationship Roundup

In the roundup this week, a few ideas to bolster your relationship building and personal brand presentation. Get apps to serve up recognition, learn to make the most out of your mistakes, read about the surge in co-shared office space, and master your body language.

Celebrate and reward – Whether engaging your team or fulfilling your commitment to uplift your network, recognition is essential. Read about several apps making virtual praise simple to execute in this Intuit blog: http://bit.ly/Smc8rZ.

There is fortune in fessing up – Rule #1. Mistakes will happen. It takes twice as much energy to try to cover up a mistake than it does to use the opportunity to exemplify authenticity and candor by admitting that it happened. Read how to let mistakes lead to improvement in this Entrepreneur article: http://bit.ly/NRBgGa.

Good timingHubspot‘s recent research on the timing of social media messages provides great tips for your online branding efforts. Read it here: http://bit.ly/QVeqeO.

Craving collaboration? – The rise in entrepreneurs and solo-preneurs has led to the opening of more co-shared office spaces generating a myriad of collaborative opportunities. Read this Harvard Business Review blog about this trend in office design here: http://bit.ly/OrR6Jp.

Master your silent language – The more we can learn to monitor and manage our body language, the more we can reduce the dissonance between our verbal and silent communication. A Harvard Business Review blogger offers tips here: http://bit.ly/UX0iVL.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Program & Community Director.

Remote Employees Are More Engaged? Really?

Employees who work remotely are actually more engaged with their teams than their “in-office” counterparts, according to a recent Harvard Business Review study. Surprised?

Our own Keith Ferrazzi has published advice on how dispersed teams can be more productive than co-located teams in Harvard Business Review, and yet my initial reaction was disbelief. How can individuals be more engaged with people they never see than with people down the hall? But author Scott Edinger proposes several possible reasons:

  1. Proximity breeds complacency.  Even co-located teams communicate primarily through email. It’s so easy to walk 100 feet to communicate personally that people take it for granted.
  2. Absence makes people try harder to connect. People make more of an effort to connect when they you don’t ordinarily interact with people.
  3. Leaders of virtual teams make better use of tools. When your primary form of connecting with people is virtual, you master many different modes of communication.
  4. Leaders of far-flung teams maximize the time their teams spend together. When remote people do finally get face-time with people they don’t see often, leaders do everything to maximize the precious time spent together.

Do you agree with Edinger’s suppositions? Have you noticed more engagement with remote teammates?

Ritu Walia is an FG Analyst.

The Kind of People You Want in Your Life

For the most part, the people that you surround yourself with are your choice. A recent Forbes article makes the argument that you should make those choices carefully and include certain types of people. Here’s the list:

  1. The instigator. This is the person you call when you want to get things done because they always say: “Let’s do it.”
  2. The cheerleader. Someone who gets you pumped up and believes in you no matter what, sort of like Donna Reed in It’s a Wonderful Life.
  3. The doubter. You always need someone to challenge you and make sure you’re really giving it your best shot.
  4. The taskmaster. The project manager type you need in your corner to make sure you’re not dropping any balls.
  5. The connector. As we always say at myGreenlight, it helps to have a great relationship with the kind of person who can connect you to the right people to make things happen.
  6. The example. This is usually your mentor, the person who has the experience and knowledge to help you get where you want to go, because they’ve already been there.

Do you agree with this list? What types would you add?

Ritu Walia is an FG Analyst.

Relationship Roundup

Self-composure is key to relationship mastery. This week in the round up, find out how to transform natural habits and create tremendous advantages, be a seeker of opportunity, collaborate, and grow.

Male body language makeover – Getting a handle on our not so subtle body language barriers allows us to create more relationship opportunities. Learn the natural disadvantages to male body language in this Forbes article here: http://onforb.es/LRgAKS.

Being the calm in the storm — Keeping cool and composed in a crisis is one of the most challenging traits to learn if it doesn’t come naturally. Leadership expert John Baldoni shares some tips for appearing cool as a cucumber under pressure. View his SmartBrief Blog here: http://bit.ly/KEbvms.

Meeting resolutions – At times, meetings can turn manic. Knowing how to settle disputes effectively can keep the entire organization on track. Learn how consultant and coach Dana Theus helps resolve meeting disputes here: http://bit.ly/LBVMJ4.

Finding opportunity – Learning how to find the opportunity in a challenge will make you an unstoppable force at the office and in your relationships. Learn how to see what’s possible in this Harvard Business Review blog by Ron Ashkenas here: http://bit.ly/MX50LK.

Ideas wide open – Holding your great ideas close to the vest doesn’t allow for the greater opportunity to grow the idea with the input of others. Learn how to take a stance of openness in Nilofer Merchant’s Harvard Business Review blog here: http://bit.ly/M5wnc8

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.

Five Ways to Maximize Your Influence as the Most Junior Person on a Team

Last week I went on my first business trip. As could be expected, I was a little scared but mostly just excited. I was the most junior person on the team, and realized quickly that I could make a difference even with my limited experience. Here’s what I learned:

  1. Over prepare. If there’s even the smallest possibility that you might need that digital recorder, take it. You never know!
  2. Be prepared to be flexible. You’re probably not going to know where you’re needed in the next 15 minutes, let alone the next hour. Take cues from your environment and find a way to be useful even if things aren’t going exactly according to plan. Believe me, usually they don’t. Continue reading

Is “Being a Mensch” Among Your Company’s Values?

At the risk of sounding like an Asana fan girl, having written about it just last week, I wanted to highlight something else they did right.

On their About page, you’ll find this list of Company Values:

Awesome, right? I’m sure they had fun hashing them out.

My favorites are 1-4, 9, and 13-15. Which of these resonate most strongly with you, and which do you actually see reflected in your own company’s culture?

Sara Grace is myGreenlight’s Program Director.

Asana: An Easy to Use, Collaborative Task Manager

There’s a new(ish) task-management collaboration tool getting some hype. I signed up. So far, I like it.

It’s called Asana and The New York Times just ran two articles about it, a long, reported one here and a shorter item here.

It’s a “souped-up to do list,” per the Times. The company’s own copy says it is “the single place to quickly capture, organize, track, and communicate everything you and your team are working on….Asana will help your team stay connected, move faster, and get more done.” Founder Dustin Moskovitz, a Facebook alum, says it’s more focused on productive workflow than Yammer. It’s true that Asana is built for tasks, tasks, tasks, and discussion about tasks. But that means it’s not as relationship-oriented, which can be as important to office productivity as administrative factors. Continue reading

Relationship Roundup

This week in the Roundup, I’m sending you into the weekend with news on collaboration, best uses for Google +, meetings that you’ll never forget, tips for finding balance and insight on the shift of power. Enjoy!

Get a collaborative boost. Collaboration is the new king of business. Author, Tammy Erickson shares why it’s key to the future of your businesses’ productivity in this HBR blog. Read it here http://bit.ly/JPF6to.

Intimacy building with Google+. Guy Kawasaki shares how social media engagement with Google + is less about getting to know new people and more about increasing the intimacy in the close circles you’ve already formed. Learn more here http://bit.ly/JKpZk1.

Memorable meetings. Part of your personal brand boils down to creativity. Long slow dinners in exotic locations for instance. Amy Levin-Epstein shares some truly creative meeting locations that will be perceived as nothing less than impressive. Read her CBS MoneyWatch blog here http://cbsn.ws/JIURDe.

Finding balance. Learning to juggle is one of the keys to being successful. In this HBR article by time coach Elizabeth Grace Saunders, learn the patterns of successful people. Read it here http://bit.ly/Koe62P.

Power shifts. The world is changing and age old concepts are changing with it. In this HBR blog, author of The New How Nolifer Merchant shares her take on the power shifts in play right now. Read it here http://bit.ly/IE6PyX.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.

Guest Blog: Ad Sales Executive Puts Never Eat Alone/myGreenlight Tactics in Action

Scott Olson is the director of marketing at Mediaspace Solutions, a marketing services agency bringing national brands to local markets. Mediaspace maximizes advertising budgets, increases ROI, and reduces operational drag through expert talent, incredible service and proven buying strategies. Our ‘What’s on Tap’ blog is updated twice a week and we’re regularly tweeting business to business marketing and advertising news.

In his best selling book Never Eat Alone Keith Ferrazzi sums up the argument for developing greater relationships when he says, “Life is less a quest than a quilt. We find meaning, love, and prosperity through the process of stitching together our bold attempts to help others find their own way in their lives. The relationships we weave become an exquisite and endless pattern,” (Never Eat Alone, 2005, p. 297, emphasis added).

Recently the Mediaspace Solutions business development group went through Ferrazzi’s book as a group in an effort to put what we learned into practice. Below are a few examples of both what’s been done and the sometimes immediate results we have experienced:

  • Small Gestures Big Impact – While on a recent trip to NYC, I decided to build a relationship with two CEO’s of major ad agencies. As part of the due diligence up front, I found out their favorite kind of wine by talking to their assistants. I purchased wine as gifts but bought Starbucks gift cards for their assistants. Both assistants were blown away by the gesture. “We never get any gifts” one said. I had two sincere conversations with two smart women and I now have regular communications with both of them. The key was being genuine and generous with no expectations in return. They are now on my “ping list” for regular communications. Keith’s teachings work. Continue reading