The Greenlight Highlight: How a Corporate Productivity Professional Builds Authentic Relationships for Business Success

Charlene DeCesare
Salem, New Hampshire
Greenlight Member Since: August 2010
Nominated by Greenlight member (George Newman)

Elevator Pitch: I am responsible for building membership for the Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp). Our focus is on the unique people practices of high performance organizations. I have a passion for helping people and companies achieve their highest potential and feel intensely grateful to be doing what I love.

What experience in your past was the moment you recognized how important relationships are to your success?

When I was at Gartner, I had a strong sense that there was untapped potential with myself and my colleagues all calling into the same clients, selling slightly different events and services. So, I created a strategic partner model that focused on assigned accounts, building relationships, and horizontal selling through referral. People bought more from me because I took the time to truly understand their business and map solutions at a much higher level. Ultimately they took my recommendations and spent more money because they liked and trusted me personally. I grew a small set of accounts by 46% in the first year and eventually helped manage a global team. Within just a few years, we grew $2M to $38M across a very small set of accounts and I know that exponential growth continued after I left. The (not so) secret sauce is in building relationships and becoming a trusted advisor. Continue reading

Relationship Roundup

In the roundup this week, a few ideas to bolster your relationship building and personal brand presentation. Get apps to serve up recognition, learn to make the most out of your mistakes, read about the surge in co-shared office space, and master your body language.

Celebrate and reward – Whether engaging your team or fulfilling your commitment to uplift your network, recognition is essential. Read about several apps making virtual praise simple to execute in this Intuit blog: http://bit.ly/Smc8rZ.

There is fortune in fessing up – Rule #1. Mistakes will happen. It takes twice as much energy to try to cover up a mistake than it does to use the opportunity to exemplify authenticity and candor by admitting that it happened. Read how to let mistakes lead to improvement in this Entrepreneur article: http://bit.ly/NRBgGa.

Good timingHubspot‘s recent research on the timing of social media messages provides great tips for your online branding efforts. Read it here: http://bit.ly/QVeqeO.

Craving collaboration? – The rise in entrepreneurs and solo-preneurs has led to the opening of more co-shared office spaces generating a myriad of collaborative opportunities. Read this Harvard Business Review blog about this trend in office design here: http://bit.ly/OrR6Jp.

Master your silent language – The more we can learn to monitor and manage our body language, the more we can reduce the dissonance between our verbal and silent communication. A Harvard Business Review blogger offers tips here: http://bit.ly/UX0iVL.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Program & Community Director.

Relationship Roundup

In the Roundup this week, tips to strengthen your reputation and network on and offline and new tools for behavioral marketing.

Building a lucky network – We agree wholeheartedly with CueBall CEO Anthony K. Tjan on what it takes to build a lucky network, “vulnerability, authenticity, generosity, and openness.” Read his perspective on how to create luck for your business ventures in his Harvard Business Review blog here: http://bit.ly/S5QCG4.

Candor is positive conflict – Conflict is an unavoidable reality, thus getting good at using it to you and your teams’ advantage should be high on the priority list. Cambridge Professor and author Mark de Rond shares how to get comfortable with team conflict. Watch his Harvard Business Review video blog here: http://bit.ly/MieIJL. Continue reading

The Greenlight Highlight: How a Seasoned Project Manager Uses Relationship Mastery to Foster Teamwork

Joseph Katucki
Wallingford, CT
Greenlight Member Since: June 2010

Elevator Pitch: “I’m not afraid of trouble, I like solving problems. I am a Project Manager specializing in turning around troubled projects. Currently I’m creating a leadership development program. I also mentor small businesses through the SBA’s SCORE program.”

What experience in your past marked the moment you recognized how important relationships are to your success? 

About five years into my professional career, I remember looking around the office and noticing who were getting fun assignments and promoted the fastest. It was those individuals who were personally and/or socially connected with the management chain.

What’s the coolest things you’re working on at home or at work right now?

I am leading the charge on an innovative leadership development program for the nearly 1,800 members of the Southern New England Project Management Institute (SNEC-PMI). It’s a program that includes a 360 leadership skills assessment, one-on-one feedback and coaching by a Center for Creative Leadership accredited leadership coach, three 3-day workshops facilitated by a hired consultant, and two 1-day events that will be open to the larger SNEC-PMI community.

The lessons I’ve learned about working with a volunteer organization have been invaluable. It’s taken a lot more time to get things moving and I have to approach every interaction with extreme generosity as every individual I rely on is there on a gifted basis. Continue reading

Be Honest About What You Want and You Just Might Get It

Sometimes the line from what you are doing right now to what you wish you were doing is not a straight one. During his Social Capitalist interview with Never Eat Alone co-author Tahl Raz, James Altucher shared a story about how, rather than attempting to map that path on the sly, coming clean about what you really want can be the best way to make it happen.

Everybody who works in a company should be thinking in this way that I’m describing. Sincere voices always rise to the top. And if they don’t, then that’s not the business for you to be in. When I worked at HBO, the television network, I was a junior programmer in the IT department. But what I really wanted to do was have a TV show. So first, I pitched to them special things I thought they should do on their website that I could do which sort of seemed like TV shows. And then I pitched directly to their television department: “Here’s an idea I would like to do for your television show.” Then they give me the opportunity to do it. They paid me to do a pilot. Continue reading