Relationship Roundup

This week in the Roundup, how to manage your time on social media, create habits that stick, put a contact in relationship time-out, and tips on communication and accountability.

Get time on your side – The addition of social media to your plate of responsibilities can be daunting personally and professionally. Managing your time in this area not only means more time on your hands, but a better presence for your brand. Learn some tips in this Hubspot blog: http://bit.ly/Qtud8F.

Creating sticky habits – We all struggle with making new habits routine. To assist, try the tips suggested in this Entrepreneur magazine blog. Read it here: http://bit.ly/Qankqs.

Relationship time-out – Inevitably someone in your network may abuse their social privileges to the point where you will want to put them in the time-out corner. Now there’s an app for that. Read about the Twitter Doghouse in this Mashable blog: http://on.mash.to/QWZICG.

True leaders communicate – Leading the tribe requires excellent communication skills. Read this SmartBrief Blog on Leadership for the communication traits of good leaders: http://bit.ly/NSxYA6.

The accountability factor – All talk and no commitment leads individuals and organizations nowhere. Learn some ways to bring accountability to the forefront of your organization’s value set. Read the Harvard Business Review blog here: http://bit.ly/N8ZvuZ.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.

From Cold Calls to Cocktails: Making the Connections that Will Transform Your Startup (and Your Social Life)

Looking to scale up your business development efforts and generate new opportunities?

Then join Sara Grace on the Social Capitalist, August 23 at 12ET, as business development expert Andy Ellwood generously opens the book on his stories, strategies, and wealth of hard-earned advice.

Click here to register!

Drawing on his popular Forbes blog, Andy will take questions and cover topics both tactical and strategic:

  • Why checking your cell phone at dinner is bad for business
  • How to make the perfect email introduction
  • The only three people you need to know at a party
  • How to host a happy hour that’s worth quadruple the bar tab
  • The key to balancing hustle with flow so that your interactions are both meaningful and productive Continue reading

Leaders Rise: Real Life Lessons from Batman

Superheroes represent everything we want to be. We read comic books, watch television, and go to the movies as children wanting to believe in the best of the world, where good always triumphs over evil, where heroes believe people are still worth sacrificing everything for.

The Christopher Nolan Batman Trilogy touched those chords while providing a deep meditation on the nature of society and some very important lessons for our own organizations.  Five were explored in a recent Forbes article.

  1. Organizations need to be built around ideas, not people. The downfall of District Attorney Harvey Dent makes clear why over-identification with a single individual is a bad idea. Part of the reason Bruce Wayne is so insistent on being Batman is because he wants to be a beacon of hope that cannot be torn down by one man’s indiscretions. Although we sometimes think of Keith Ferrazzi as our Batman, it’s the ideas he co-creates with the rest of the organization that really matter.
  2. Actions matter more than intentions. You are what you do. Bruce Wayne protests that he’s not the playboy he seems to be upon running into childhood friend Rachel Dawes in Batman Begins, and she replies: “But it’s not who you are underneath, it’s what you do that defines you.”  So act on your best intentions now. Fund R&D before that great engineering talent walks out the door. Promote that awesome but overqualified clerk you hired before he’s stolen away.
  3. Trust people with the truth. “Leaders often trick themselves into thinking that people can’t be trusted with the truth. ” That’s a bad idea, particularly when things aren’t going well with your organization. Trust your team, and you’ll find they redouble their efforts to solve the problem at hand, just as Gotham does when the city learns the truth about Harvey Dent.
  4. You need to risk failure in order to succeed. (Dark Knight Rises SPOILER) When discussing what seems to be an impossible jump required to escape prison in the Dark Knight Rises, Wayne says he doesn’t fear death. A fellow prisoner chastises him, pointing out that it’s the fear of death that will drive you to “move faster than possible, fight longer than possible.” Don’t focus on not losing what you have.  You’re just as likely to lose it by not risking it. Encourage your team to take risks when they’re required in order to succeed.
  5. When you do fail, don’t let it destroy you. Fighting harder after failing defines true greatness and courage. (Dark Knight Rises SPOILER) Batman rises above his defeat by Bane in the Dark Knight Rises and fights for Gotham that much harder. Forbes blogger, Alex Knapp concludes his post by pointing  out that great business leaders do the same. “In other words, Steve Jobs learned to pick himself back up. So did Bruce Wayne. And so can you.”

Can you think of any other Batman lessons? What would you add?

Ritu Walia is an FG Analyst.

Relationship Roundup

This week in the Roundup, tips for building accountability, understanding the power of language, securing commitments from prospects, and taking culture past the friendly point.

Where accountability starts and stops – Accountability is the foundation of sustainable change. Consultant and author Steve Tobak shares how to reinforce the accountability in your company. Read the CBS Money Watch article here: http://cbsn.ws/MWBcjz.

The language of our corporate cultures – Words have power. In this Harvard Business Review blog, author Kevin Allen Partners explores the way language creates the environment for corporate culture. Read it here: http://bit.ly/NJN2Qx.

Getting a commitment – Getting prospects to commit requires strategy. Sales expert and author Tom Searcy provides tips for achieving the big C. Read the article here: http://cbsn.ws/NuZXsj.

Building cultures that are beyond friendly – Culture specialist Chris Edmonds writes about the three elements that create thriving and healthy organizational cultures. Read the blog here: http://cbsn.ws/NuZXsj.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director.