Fixing Your Gmail Autofill So You’re Not Emailing People at Old Addresses

Have you sent an important email to an associate and realized three days or three weeks later that they never got it because it was an ancient address that Gmail decided to autofill in without you noticing? And once you realized it, you picked apart Gmail but couldn’t figure out how to solve the problem?

Help is here: Complete instructions on how to change the auto-complete addresses in Gmail so that you don’t keep emailing a contact at his or her old address!

(It actually took me a good amount of time and help from a coworker to figure this out.)

  1. First you have to click on the Gmail tab under the Google header on the left side of the page and select contacts.
  2. Once you’re in the contacts section, you can search for the contact you wish to edit in the search field.
  3. Once you’re on the contact page, you can make edits.

Viola! These two minutes of work can save you from emailing the wrong address over and over again once and for all. Get to it immediately when you learn a contact has a new address.

Another idea: Next time you update your own email, send these instructions with your announcement to make it easy on your Gmail-using friends.

Ritu Walia is an FG Analyst.

Christine Comaford and the Buddhist Principle that Changes Everything

Christine Comaford – author, entrepreneur, coach, and ex-Buddhist monk – has a unique pedigree and an equally unique perspective on leadership. In this excerpt from her Social Capitalist Live Interview, she shares her thoughts on the roles that focus and presence, key Buddhist principles, play.

Christine says:

Focus and presence to me are the foundation of leadership. When you choose to be exactly here, exactly now, there’s a couple of things that happen.

First of all, people feel that you’re aware, they feel that you care. Let’s also think about social media and why it’s so popular. It fulfills this deep need in people to be seen. When you grew up, did you really feel seen and acknowledged as a kid? Probably not. In your daily life, do you feel like people are really deeply, profoundly connecting with you every moment? Probably not, right? The more input we have coming in, the more phones and email, texting and etc., the less present we are. Continue reading

Relationship Roundup

This week in the roundup, a networking power plan, Gen Y’s relational advantage, responding to negative feedback, and the Smile Factor.

Network power plan – Pre-planning your strategy for networking events betters your chances for getting to the right prospects so you can focus on whom to build relationships with. Learn how to create a solid game plan in this CBS MoneyWatch article: http://cbsn.ws/MZx8xS.

Gen Y Advantage – It seems that Gen Y knows how to build relationships with its younger counterparts to the advantage of their careers. Learn what they are doing here: http://cbsn.ws/LBVUIj.

Responding to Negative Feedback – Social media is making customer relationships tricky to manage. Being skillful with your response to negative feedback is critical. Learn some of the finer points of feedback response here: http://bit.ly/KI5Agn.

The Smile Factor – Warming up a face-to-face introduction with a smile often works. Making your marketing deliver the same effect can have long lasting positive results in building the relationship with the customer. Learn how to create smile worthy communication here: http://bit.ly/N2K9J4.

Kibibi Springs is myGreenlight’s Community Director. 

The Secret Formula That Will Score You a Meeting with ANY VIP – from Christine Comaford

During her Social Capitalist Interview, multi-hyphenate Christine Comaford (author, entrepreneur, consultant, coach…) shared the secrets from her blog post titled: “I Stalked Steve Jobs and How to Get a Meeting with Any VIP.”

Christine says:

“It’s not that hard to get a meeting with any VIP. The quick recipe is to ask for five minutes of their time in exchange for you giving five hours to their favorite nonprofit.

So you’ve got to do some homework. When you first connect with them, send a letter. I prefer a letter that’s typed and sent via FedEx. One of my clients, a huge high-level executive at Deloitte just used this approach. He finally got through to someone he’s been trying to reach for three months.

You figure out what it is that you want: I want five minutes of advice from Joe Blow. So then you send a letter, one page or less. Don’t ramble on. Just say, ‘Wow, I really admire the accomplishments that you’ve made, Joe Blow, in your life. I want to do that too. I would love to ask you for five minutes of advice.’ Continue reading

A Simple Exercise to Overcome Shyness

If social interactions stress you out, you might be interested in this Psychology Today piece offering some simple exercises to overcome shyness and social anxiety.

The author suggests some group improvisational exercises that are worth checking out. But for those who want something they can do on their own, there’s this one:

“…go to a mall at a busy time of day. Take off your watch. Ask twenty people for the time of day. Use three minutes between requests. You log the results of each encounter. You later look at your findings. Here is what you are likely to find. Most will give you the time of day. Some will walk past you as though you didn’t exist. A few may engage you in a brief and pleasant conversation.”

The idea is to approach enough people that it starts to feel natural.

Anyone else have ideas for “safe” ways to practice interacting with strangers?

Ritu Walia is an FG Analyst.

Jeffrey Pfeffer: Get Comfortable with Standing Out or You Never Will

Stanford Professor Jeffrey Pfeffer is the author of 13 books.  He discussed his most recent, Power: Why Some People Have It and Others Don’t during a Social Capitalist interview.

So I look at folks. I think the average human being, not everybody, but the average human being, is too concerned about what other people think. They are too worried about standing out. They’re too worried about asking for favors because they’re worried about what other people would think about them and they’re worried about being too bold. Continue reading