Joe Navarro: A Big Sign of How Well Your Presentation is Going

As one of the original founding members of the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Program, Joe Navarro mastered the ability to read nonverbal body language. When he retired in 2003, he discovered his expertise and skills could be taught, to benefit everyone from professional poker players to executives who wanted an extra edge. Since then, he has authored numerous books, including the classic What Every BODY Is Saying.

Here, a brief excerpt from Joe’s Social Capitalist interview with Tahl Raz. What’s the first clue that you have lost your audience?

Go to any conference where the students, the workers, executives, whoever, don’t like the speaker, and all of a sudden you’ll see that they begin to put an object on top of themselves—a briefcase, a purse, a laptop. But when they’re in the presence of somebody that they enjoy, they begin to unveil themselves by getting rid of these objects. So, there’s lots of behaviors that show, I’m really interested, I’d like to get to know you more, I’d like to get closer to you, and so forth. And a lot of that has to do with we begin to show features of comfort in our forehead, our eyes, our face, and so forth.

So during a presentation, keep an eye on the audience to see if they begin to unveil themselves and settle into the topic. For more great insights on nonverbal cues, read the entire Social Capitalist transcript: Social Capitalist – Joe Navarro. Click here for the audio recording.

Is “Being a Mensch” Among Your Company’s Values?

At the risk of sounding like an Asana fan girl, having written about it just last week, I wanted to highlight something else they did right.

On their About page, you’ll find this list of Company Values:

Awesome, right? I’m sure they had fun hashing them out.

My favorites are 1-4, 9, and 13-15. Which of these resonate most strongly with you, and which do you actually see reflected in your own company’s culture?

Sara Grace is myGreenlight’s Program Director.

How Networking Affects Your Paycheck

“Among executive board members, women earn 17 percent less than their male counterparts,” according to a recent Economist article.

The article offer explanations for why this might be the case, including career interruptions associated with having kids and simple discrimination. But the most interesting of these possible explanations is the idea that women’s networking style isn’t as effective for career climbing as men’s.

The author suggests that women tend to have smaller networks, but with stronger relationship ties. Men meanwhile stack up weak ties, or acquaintances, and do a better job keeping a high profile within those broad networks. Weak ties are well known to be the more frequent source of new jobs and opportunities. Continue reading

Christine Comaford’s Tip for Making Sure Your Message Gets Through

During her dynamic interview as part of our Social Capitalist series, Christine Comaford shared the concept of metaprograms. Created by Rodger Bailey, these are lenses through which people see the world.  Knowing which lens is in use is key to making sure your message is heard and received.

Christine says:

“The first metaprogram is towards or away. Each of these meta-programs is polarized. So if somebody is like, “Yes, I want to launch new initiatives, I want goals, I want forward motion,” that’s a towards person. An away person is all about risk mitigation: “Let’s be cautious, let’s not go crazy and jump in.”

The CEOs, the marketing people, the sales people, are often towards people. The CIOs, maybe, the accounting people, maybe HR, are away. So if you’re trying to get a CFO on board of a certain initiative, you say, “Hey, you know what? Let’s be real cautious, let’s make sure we’ve got all the I’s dotted and T’s crossed.” They’re going to feel a sense of rapport with you. Now you’re not this crazed sales or marketing or other type of towards person who wants to mow them down.

The next one is options or procedures. Options people are like, “Wow, here’s all these possibilities. We could do this and that and that,” and everybody’s all excited. Procedures people, listening to that, are getting freaked out. Procedures people are thinking, “OK, I just need to know step one, step two, step three, because I don’t want to mess it up. Don’t give me all those choices.” Continue reading

The Greenlight Highlight: How a Social Media Strategist Uses Relationship Mastery to be Systematic and Authentic

Anita Windisman
OneOfAKindMarketing.com
Toronto, Canada
Greenlight Member Since: December 2011

Elevator Pitch: Social media strategist & consultant. Helping you grow your professional practice or customer base by mastering LinkedIn.

What experience in your past was the moment you recognized how important relationships are to your success?

I’ve always been a connector and a networker and didn’t realize the full impact of that skill. I network naturally and being the hub and knowing what’s going on has always been a part of who I am. I value relationships. My network goes back to grade school. Loyalty is what I’m about.

What’s the coolest things you’re working on at home or at work right now?

Professionally I just launched my third public LinkedIn workshop. I love offering my services to small businesses and freelancers. On the other end of the spectrum I love working with very senior executives helping them showcase their expertise on LinkedIn. Both audiences need LinkedIn, but the reasons for doing so are different. I address the individual and the executive with the same tools, but in different ways. Continue reading

Relationship Roundup

In the roundup this week, an in-depth look at quick wins, what we can learn from bad behavior, the softer side of power, the value of youth in your network, and creative first impressions.

Quick wins – At myGreenlight we fully support the concept of quick wins on the way to big audacious goals. Read one Harvard Business Review blogger’s view on their benefits here: http://bit.ly/JH90V8.

Anti-relationship lessons – A view from the other side of the street is always a good way to heighten our perception and understanding. In this SmartBrief Blog, a few behaviors that will guarantee you won’t be #1 on anyone’s relationship list. Read more here: http://bit.ly/KXFZDk.

The softer side of power – The concept of what makes someone powerful is shifting. In this recap of Harvard Professor Joseph Nye’s new book, The Future of Power, there are three lessons on the softer side of power and how to apply them. Read Scott Eblin’s blog here: http://bit.ly/JqE8nZ. Continue reading

You’re Invited: Keith Ferrazzi and LinkedIn Founder Reid Hoffman LIVE

Join Keith Ferrazzi, CEO of Ferrazzi Greenlight, in conversation with Reid Hoffman, founder of LinkedIn and author of The Start-up of You: Adapt to the Future, Invest in Yourself, and Transform Your Career, at this month’s Social Capitalist Live Event, Tuesday, June 12 at 12:30 PM ET (NOTE UPDATED TIME!)

Register here for the live Webex event!

During the lively, 45-minute discussion with audience Q&A, you’ll learn:

  • The backstory: how and why Reid launched LinkedIn
  • How thinking like a Silicon Valley entrepreneur enhances success in any career
  • How Reid personally leverages his LinkedIn page
  • The keys to maximizing your network literacy, the ability to conceptualize, access, and benefit from the information flowing through your social network

…And much, much more! If you can’t make it, register anyway – we’ll send you a recording and transcript afterwards.

What people are saying about The Start-up of You:

“The Internet has fundamentally changed the architecture of business and society. This terrific book shows you how to live, learn, and thrive in a networked world.”

“Crammed with insights and strategies to help each of us create the work life we want.”

“…start with an idea and work over your entire career to adapt it into something remarkable. This book distills the key techniques needed to succeed.”

See you there!

Asana: An Easy to Use, Collaborative Task Manager

There’s a new(ish) task-management collaboration tool getting some hype. I signed up. So far, I like it.

It’s called Asana and The New York Times just ran two articles about it, a long, reported one here and a shorter item here.

It’s a “souped-up to do list,” per the Times. The company’s own copy says it is “the single place to quickly capture, organize, track, and communicate everything you and your team are working on….Asana will help your team stay connected, move faster, and get more done.” Founder Dustin Moskovitz, a Facebook alum, says it’s more focused on productive workflow than Yammer. It’s true that Asana is built for tasks, tasks, tasks, and discussion about tasks. But that means it’s not as relationship-oriented, which can be as important to office productivity as administrative factors. Continue reading

The Ups and Downs of Workplace Flexibility

Since 2005 the percentage of employers allowing (at least some) employees to work some of their regular paid hours at home on a regular basis has increased from 34 percent to 63 percent, according to the 2012 National Study of Employers.

In this Glass Hammer article, Day-to-Day Flexibility Increases, While Career Flex Drops, the cost of such a change is questioned. Although there is an increased amount of flexibility in the daily lives of employees, in regards to time and location, it seems harder to incorporate more long-term changes.

A lot of the flexibility comes down to the technology advances that we have seen in last couple of decades. Due to the fact that most work can now be done virtually, productivity isn’t harmed in this process.”On the other hand, companies do not seem to be acknowledging the importance of retaining long-term, experienced employees who may need to decrease their work-schedule for a more extended amount of time due to personal pulls,” the author writes. Continue reading